Eric  Gregory

    • Profile

      Eric Gregory joined the faculty in 2001, and was promoted to Professor in 2009. He is the author of Politics and the Order of Love: An Augustinian Ethic of Democratic Citizenship (University of Chicago Press, 2008). His interests include religious and philosophical ethics, theology, political theory, law and religion, and the role of religion in public life. In 2007 he was awarded Princeton's President's Award for Distinguished Teaching. A graduate of Harvard College, he earned an M.Phil. and Diploma in Theology from the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, and his doctorate in Religious Studies from Yale University. He has received fellowships from the Erasmus Institute, University of Notre Dame, the Safra Foundation Center for Ethics, Harvard University, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Among his current projects is a book tentatively titled, What Do We Owe Strangers? Globalization and the Good Samaritan, which examines secular and religious perspectives on global justice. Prof. Gregory is currently a fellow at The Tikvah Center for Law & Jewish Civilization at New York University School of Law. He is on leave fall semester 2013.

    • Webpage

    • Publications

      "Christianity and the Rise of the Democratic State," Political Theology for a Plural Age, ed., Michael Kessler (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013), 99-107.

      "America and the Church: John Courtney Murray, Reinhold Niebuhr, and H. Richard Niebuhr," An Eerdmans Reader in Contemporary Political Theology, eds., William T. Cavanaugh, Jeffrey W. Bailey, and Craig Hovey (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2012), 217-222.

      "The Jewish Roots of the Modern Republic," Harvard Theological Review 105.3 (July 2012): 372-380.

      "Politics & The Order of Love: An Augustinian Ethic of Democratic Citizenship?"

      "Sympathy and Domination: Adam Smith and the Virtues of Augustinianism," Adam Smith as Theologian, ed. Paul Oslington, (New York: Routledge, 2011), 33-45.

      "Augustinians and the New Liberalism," Augustinian Studies 41.1 (2010): 315-332.

      "Politics," The Oxford Handbook of Evangelical Theology, ed. Gerald McDermott, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), 389-401.

      "The Spirit and the Letter: Protestant Thomism and Nigel Biggar's 'Karl Barth's Ethics Revisited',"Commanding Grace: Studies in Karl Barth's Ethics, ed. Daniel Migliore, (Eerdmans 2010), 50-59.


      "Religion and Bioethics," A Companion to Bioethics: Second Edition, eds. Peter A. Singer and Helga Kuhse, (Blackwell 2009), 46-55.


      "Response to John Finnis: Inviting More Explication and More Economy," The Naked Public Square Reconsidered: Religion and Politics in the Twenty-First Century, ed. Christopher Wolfe, (ISI Books 2009), 141-150.


      "Agape and Special Relations in a Global Economy: Theological Sources," Global Neighbors: Christian Faith and Moral Obligation in Today's Economy, eds. Douglas Hicks and Mark Valeri, (Eerdmans 2008), 16-42.

      "A Protestant View: The Ethics of Embryo Adoption and the Catholic Tradition," in The Ethics of Embryo Adoption and the Catholic Tradition: Moral Arguments, Economic Realities, and Social Analysis, eds. Sarah-Vaughn Brakman and Darlene Fozard Weaver, (Springer 2007), 199-218.

      "Before the Original Position: The Neo-Orthodox Theology of the Young John Rawls,"Journal of Religious Ethics 35.2 (June 2007): 179-206.
    • Curriculum Vitae