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Instructors
Staff
A History of Sex, Sexuality, and Religion in America

This course explores the relationship between, sex, sexuality, and religion in the United States over the last two centuries. We employ historical methodologies to trace how sex and sexuality have been contested and contentious issues within certain American religious contexts and focus on how religiously informed notions of sex and sexuality have touched every area of American life, including popular culture, politics, and the law. Sex not only "sells" as the old adage states, but the control and/or prohibition of sex and sexuality have set the terms for most aspects of American society.

Instructors
Wallace D. Best
African Immigrant Religions in America

No description available

Instructors
Staff
Asian Religions Workshop

A weekly workshop focused on disciplinary questions, professional development, and presentation and discussion of work in progress. Required for all students, pre-generals and post-generals, in Asian Religions. Open to other students with permission of the instructor. REL 527 (fall) and REL 528 (spring) constitute this year-long workshop. Students must complete both semesters to receive credit.

Instructors
Stephen F. Teiser
Asian Religions Workshop

A weekly, year-long workshop focused on current student and faculty research in Asian religions. The course is designed primarily for graduate students working on dissertations and general examination essays in Asian Religions subfield of the Religion Department. Note: REL 527 (fall) and REL 528 (spring) constitute this year-long workshop. In order to receive credit, students must take the course both semesters. Open to other students with permission of instructor.

Instructors
Jonathan C. Gold
Asian Religions Workshop

A weekly workshop focused on disciplinary questions, professional development, and presentation and discussion of work in progress. Required for all students, pre-generals and post-generals, in Asian Religions. Open to other students with permission of the instructor. REL 527 (fall) and REL 528 (spring) constitute this year-long workshop. Students must complete both semesters to receive credit.

Instructors
Stephen F. Teiser
Book-History Approaches to American Religious History

No Description Available

Instructors
Staff
Buddhist Philosophy in India and Tibet

No description available

Instructors
Staff
Buddhist Philosophy: Language and Interpretation

No description available

Instructors
Staff
Classics, Commentaries, and Contexts in Chinese Intellectual History: Ritual Classics

This course examines classical Chinese texts and their commentary traditions, with commentary selections and additional readings from the earliest periods through the early twentieth century.

Instructors
Trenton W. Wilson
Critical Readings in Slavery Studies

No description available

Instructors
Staff
Culture, Society and Religion Workshop

Presentation and critical discussion of research in progress by participants, dealing with the study of religion in any field within the humanities and social sciences. Note: REL 517 (fall) and REL 517 (spring) constitute this year-long workshop. In order to receive credit, students must take the course both semesters.

Instructors
Jonathan C. Gold
Jenny Wiley Legath
Culture, Society and Religion Workshop

Presentation and critical discussion of research in progress by participants, dealing with the study of religion in any field within the humanities and social sciences. Note: REL 517 (fall) and REL 517 (spring) constitute this year-long workshop. In order to receive credit, students must take the course both semesters.

Instructors
Jonathan C. Gold
Jenny Wiley Legath
Introduction to Coptic Language and Literature

This course offers an introduction to Coptic language and literatures. The class provides the foundational grammatical and linguistic concepts to build elementary Coptic reading competency (with focus on the Sahidic dialect primarily but not exclusively). Through course examples and group reading, students gain exposure to a broad Coptic corpus including Nag Hammadi literature, martyr literature, monastic texts, magic or medical recipes, and other documentary texts. The course also introduces students to the tools and resources of Coptic studies - dictionaries, grammars, as well as digital humanities resources.

Instructors
Lydia C. Bremer-McCollum
Introduction to Philosophical Kabbalah

No description available

Instructors
Staff
Khomeini's Islamic Republic

In this seminar, we probe the idea of an "Islamic Republic," both in the writings of the most prominent leader of the 1979 Islamic Revolution in Iran, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, and in the writings of modern and contemporary Iranian thinkers and political figures. We engage in an extensive study of Khomeini's theory of Islamic government, as well as a study of scholars who influenced him. We also study political debates in the decade after the Revolution over what institutions should comprise an Islamic government. The course ends with a study of reformist and conservative theories of state in contemporary Iran.

Instructors
Nura A. Hossainzadeh
Late Medieval-Early Modern Islam

This seminar focuses on Islamic thought and society during the 17th and the 18th centuries. Our key concerns are two: to understand what Islam, and Islamic thought, looked like in the late medieval and the early modern world; and to think about how we should try to approach the study of Islam in that world. A good deal of our focus is on South Asia, though we also read about other regions, including Iran and the Arab Middle East. The required readings are in English. For those interested, some weeks might have supplementary readings in Arabic as well.

Instructors
Muhammad Q. Zaman
Late Medieval-Early Modern Islam

This seminar focuses on Islamic thought and society during the 17th and the 18th centuries. Our key concerns are two: to understand what Islam, and Islamic thought, looked like in the late medieval and the early modern world; and to think about how we should try to approach the study of Islam in that world. A good deal of our focus is on South Asia, though we also read about other regions, including Iran and the Arab Middle East. The required readings are in English. For those interested, some weeks might have supplementary readings in Arabic as well.

Instructors
Muhammad Q. Zaman
Late Medieval-Early Modern Islam

This seminar focuses on Islamic thought and society during the 17th and the 18th centuries. Our key concerns are two: to understand what Islam, and Islamic thought, looked like in the late medieval and the early modern world; and to think about how we should try to approach the study of Islam in that world. A good deal of our focus is on South Asia, though we also read about other regions, including Iran and the Arab Middle East. The required readings are in English. For those interested, some weeks might have supplementary readings in Arabic as well.

Instructors
Muhammad Q. Zaman
Late Medieval-Early Modern Islam

This seminar focuses on Islamic thought and society during the 17th and the 18th centuries. Our key concerns are two: to understand what Islam, and Islamic thought, looked like in the late medieval and the early modern world; and to think about how we should try to approach the study of Islam in that world. A good deal of our focus is on South Asia, though we also read about other regions, including Iran and the Arab Middle East. The required readings are in English. For those interested, some weeks might have supplementary readings in Arabic as well.

Instructors
Muhammad Q. Zaman

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