Undergraduate Course Archive

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Roman Religion: Sources and Methods (HA)
Subject associations
CLA 422 / HUM 422 / REL 422

What was/is Roman religion? Our main focus in this course will be the nature, variety, and geographic range of the source material for religious practice in the Mediterranean world of the Roman Republic and Empire (6th c. BCE-5th c. CE). We'll examine how, and with what repercussions, Roman religion set the terms for and changed in response to Rome's expansion into a Mediterranean empire. Finally, we'll think about the place of "Roman religion" in the global history of religion, and the usefulness of the term "religion" to characterize how the Romans related to their gods.

Instructors
Dan-El Padilla Peralta
Introduction to Jewish Cultures (EM)
Subject associations
COM 202 / JDS 203 / REL 203

This course explores the relationship between culture, history, religion, and ethics in global Jewish experience from the Bible to the present. Following representations of themes such as sexuality, suffering, and mysticism, we'll debate the boundaries between religion and culture and see how ethical questions play out in cultural forms. How does Jewish law, ritual, and custom inform Jewish culture, and how does culture sometimes push back against religious norms? Topics include Bible and Talmud, kabbalah, sexuality, Yiddish, Arab Jews, Zionism, Jewish music, food, literature, cinema, and comics. No background required; readings in English.

Instructors
Lital Levy
Literature and Religion: Christianity in Korean and Korean-American Novels and Films (CD or LA)
Subject associations
COM 381 / REL 385 / ASA 381 / EAS 382

This course explores the role of American Christianity in canonical and popular Korean and Korean-American novels and films. While the references to Christianity in these novels and films serve to indicate the active presence of American Christian missionaries in 20th century Korea, we will pay attention to the ways in which the figures of American Christianity function in these narratives.

Instructors
John Park
Professional Responsibility & Ethics: Succeeding Without Selling Your Soul (EM)
Subject associations
EGR 219 / ENT 219 / REL 219

The course objective is to equip future leaders to successfully identify and navigate ethical dilemmas in their careers. The course integrates ethical theory and practice with practical tools for values-based leadership and ethics in professional life (e.g., public policy, for-profit and non-profit, business, tech, and other contexts). It also considers the role of religion as a potential resource for ethical formation and decision-making frameworks. The class explores contemporary case studies and includes guest CEOs and thought leaders from different professional spheres and backgrounds.

Instructors
David W. Miller
Business Ethics and Modern Religious Thought (EM)
Subject associations
EGR 219 / ENT 219 / REL 219

The course objective is to equip future leaders to successfully navigate ethical dilemmas in their future careers. Students will learn basic ethics theory, classical ethical schools, and develop practical tools for business ethics. The course focuses on the role of religion and spirituality as a resource for ethical formation, frameworks, and decision-making. This will be applied to contemporary business ethics case studies and wider issues surrounding faith and work, and will include guest CEO visitors.

Instructors
David W. Miller
Business Ethics: Succeeding without Selling Your Soul (EM)
Subject associations
EGR 219 / ENT 219 / REL 219

The course objective is to equip future leaders to successfully identify and navigate ethical dilemmas in their careers. The course integrates theory and practice. Students will learn basic ethical theories and develop practical tools for personal and applied ethics in business, entrepreneurial, and broader marketplace contexts. The course focuses on and explores the role of religion and spirituality as a resource for ethical formation, frameworks, and decision-making. The class will explore weekly contemporary case studies, wider trends on faith and work, and include guest CEO visitors from different industry sectors and traditions.

Instructors
David W. Miller
Business Ethics: Succeeding without Selling Your Soul (EM)
Subject associations
EGR 219 / ENT 219 / REL 219

The course objective is to equip future leaders to successfully identify and navigate ethical dilemmas in their careers. The course integrates theory and practice. Students will learn basic ethical theories and develop practical tools for personal and applied ethics in business, entrepreneurial, and broader marketplace contexts. The course focuses on and explores the role of religion and spirituality as a resource for ethical formation, frameworks, and decision-making. The class will explore weekly contemporary case studies, wider trends on faith and work, and include guest CEO visitors from different industry sectors and traditions.

Additional description

Does NOT satisfy sub-field requirement; does NOT count as departmental. Majors may petition to count this as a cognate course (in addition to the 9 required courses for the major).

Instructors
David W. Miller
Professional Responsibility & Ethics: Succeeding Without Selling Your Soul (EM)
Subject associations
EGR 219 / ENT 219 / REL 219

The course objective is to equip future leaders to successfully identify and navigate ethical dilemmas in their careers. The course integrates ethical theory and practice with practical tools for values-based leadership and ethics in professional life (e.g., public policy, for-profit and non-profit, business, tech, and other contexts). It also considers the role of religion as a potential resource for ethical formation and decision-making frameworks. The class explores contemporary case studies and includes guest CEOs and thought leaders from different professional spheres and backgrounds.

Instructors
David W. Miller
Religion and Ethics in Environmental Justice Activism (CD or SA)
Subject associations
ENV 204 / REL 204 / AMS 204

To what degree has religion shaped the environmental justice movement? This course in environmental humanities and social sciences examines the impact of religious ideas, persons, practices, and institutions on the values and strategies of environmental, food, and climate justice activists. It also grapples with the significance of this impact for environmental thought and policy. Students engage with primary sources, media, scholarship, and community organizations to study cases in the US South, New Jersey, the tropics, and the planet as a whole, culminating in a collaborative project with a community partner.

Instructors
Ryan Juskus
The History of Christianity in Africa: From St. Mark to Desmond Tutu (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 423 / AFS 424 / REL 423

This course will trace the history of Christianity in Africa from the first to twentieth centuries. We will focus on issues as diverse as the importance of Christians from Africa in the development of central Christian doctrines and institutions, the medieval Christian-Muslim encounter, the modern missionary movement, colonization and decolonization, the role of the church in freedom struggles, and more. We will ask the questions:how does studying the history of Christianity in Africa de-center Europe and the European experience in the history of Christianity? And:What would a global history of Christianity, pre-modern and modern, look like?

Instructors
Jacob S. Dlamini
Jack B. Tannous
The History of Christianity in Africa: From St. Mark to Desmond Tutu (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 423 / AFS 424 / REL 423

This course will trace the history of Christianity in Africa from the first to twentieth centuries. We will focus on issues as diverse as the importance of Christians from Africa in the development of central Christian doctrines and institutions, the medieval Christian-Muslim encounter, the modern missionary movement, colonization and decolonization, the role of the church in freedom struggles, and more. We will ask the questions:how does studying the history of Christianity in Africa de-center Europe and the European experience in the history of Christianity? And:What would a global history of Christianity, pre-modern and modern, look like?

Instructors
Jacob S. Dlamini
Jack B. Tannous
Jesus and Buddha (EM)
Subject associations
HUM 290 / REL 282

This course invites us to compare the stories, teachings, lives, deaths, and communities associated with Jesus and Buddha. While respecting each tradition's unique and distinctive sources, cultures, ideas and legacies, it invites us to deepen our understanding of each tradition by looking through the lens of the other. Course readings include accounts of the lives of Jesus and Buddha, what each taught about how to live and create society, and how they articulate the meaning of life and death, suffering and salvation.

Additional description

Department Area Requirement: Does NOT satisfy sub-field requirement; does count as departmental.

Instructors
Jonathan C. Gold
Elaine H. Pagels
Jesus and Buddha (EM)
Subject associations
HUM 290 / REL 282

This course invites us to compare the stories, teachings, lives, deaths, and communities associated with Jesus and Buddha. While respecting each tradition's unique and distinctive sources, cultures, ideas and legacies, it invites us to deepen our understanding of each tradition by looking through the lens of the other. Course readings include accounts of the lives of Jesus and Buddha, what each taught about how to live and create society, and how they articulate the meaning of life and death, suffering and salvation.

Additional description

Area of Study Requirement: Does NOT satisfy sub-field requirement; does count as departmental.

Instructors
Jonathan C. Gold
Elaine H. Pagels
Jesus and Buddha (EM)
Subject associations
HUM 290 / REL 282

This course introduces the study of religion by juxtaposing the narratives, teachings, careers and legacies of the founders of Christianity and Buddhism. While respecting each tradition's unique and distinctive texts, rituals, philosophies, and histories, the course invites us to deepen our understanding of each tradition by looking through the lens of the other. Course readings will include accounts of the lives of Jesus and Buddha, what each taught about how to live and create society, and how each understood the meaning of life and death, suffering and salvation.

Instructors
Jonathan C. Gold
Elaine H. Pagels
Incarceration in Antiquity (HA)
Subject associations
HUM 315 / CLA 315 / REL 315 / HLS 349

Material and textual data indicate carceral practices were regular features in the ancient Mediterranean. This course begins by discussing select key works in the field of carceral studies, and considers ancient evidence to discuss the challenges of identifying prison spaces, the role of the state in incarceration, and the purpose(s) of incarceration in antiquity. A digital humanities component (mapping carceral sites and producing 3D models) will give students an intricate understanding of ancient carceral geographies and introduce them to digital humanities. The course requires international travel during Fall Break.

Instructors
Caroline Cheung
Matthew Larsen
Religion and the City (EM)
Subject associations
HUM 339 / REL 398 / URB 339

This course introduces students to the socio-historical and political processes through which religion is represented, contested, and managed in the built environment. The course pays particular attention to the way that claims of religion implicate questions of diversity, difference, and justice in contemporary cities. Students will study the conceptual and historical debates on the role and place of religion in the public sphere and analyze empirical cases of how spatial decisions regulate or enable expressions of religious difference in urban settings.

Instructors
Babak Manouchehrifar
Indigenous Peoples and Christianity (CD or HA)
Subject associations
HUM 353 / REL 304 / AMS 314

The momentous encounter of Europeans and Indigenous peoples had shattering consequences for the worldview and identity of both groups. The encounters raised a host of existential questions that seemed to demonstrate the inadequacy of each culture's traditional religious models of the world. This course explores the effects of contact from early 17th-centruy encounters in Canada and North America into the residential schools of the 19th and 20th centuries. The course explores the effects of contact: contrasting prescriptive Christian ideals of conversion with the descriptive reality of mutual change and influence.

Instructors
Emma J. Anderson
Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities: Justice Then and Now (EM)
Subject associations
HUM 470 / CLA 470 / REL 470

This course examines ancient texts that have been central to modern conceptions of justice. We will analyze these texts in their own context, understanding both their own arguments and those that they criticize; look at how they have functioned to support different positions in the more recent past; and interrogate whether they should continue to have a role in shaping our notions of justice, and if so, what role that should be. The seminar will include discussions with justice-impacted individuals, as well as the potential for interested students to carry out a community-based project.

Instructors
Joshua H. Billings
Moulie Vidas
Great Books of the Jewish Tradition (HA)
Subject associations
JDS 202 / REL 202

An introduction to some of the major works of Jewish thought and literature that survive from antiquity until the early modern era. We'll closely read a wide array of primary texts in translation, from the Hebrew Bible to Spinoza, discuss the worlds in which the people who produced them lived, and consider some of the ways in which they add up to an ongoing tradition across time and space - and some of the ways in which they don't. Students with reading knowledge of Hebrew and Aramaic are warmly encouraged to use them, but this is optional; nor prior knowledge of Judaism is required.

Instructors
Eve Krakowski
Great Books of the Jewish Tradition (HA)
Subject associations
JDS 202 / REL 202

This course is intended to introduce students to the classical Jewish tradition through a close reading of portions of some of its great books, including the Hebrew Bible, the Midrash, the Talmud, the Passover Haggadah, Maimonides's Guide for the Perplexed, the Zohar, and Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise. We will pay particular attention to the role of interpretation in forming Jewish tradition.

Instructors
Ra'anan S. Boustan