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Who Was or Is Jesus? (HA)

Who Was - or is - Jesus In History, Art, Film, Music, Politics? What do we actually know about Jesus of Nazarcth? We start by looking at the earliest known sources-accounts in the New Testament; what Jewish, Roman, Greek contemporaries said of him, and also ancient gospels not in the NT (like the Gospel of Thomas, Gospel of Mary Magdalene), Next, we'll explore an amazing range of interpretations of Jesus in art, poetry, music, theology, and politics, throughout 2000 years to the present, including newly emerging views.

Instructors
Elaine H. Pagels
Who Wrote the Bible (HA)

The course will introduce students to the Hebrew Bible ("Old Testament") in its ancient Near Eastern setting. Key concepts such as God, worship, the afterlife, and history, will be scrutinized through a careful reading of a selection of Biblical texts including the Creation and Garden of Eden narratives in Genesis, the laws of Deuteronomy, the prophecies of Isaiah, and the poetry of Psalms. Particular attention will be paid to questions of authorship--possible dating, social setting, and original audience; and to transformations that the texts underwent through a continuous process of transmission and interpretation.

Instructors
Laura E. Quick
Who Wrote the Bible (HA)

The Hebrew Bible (Christian "Old Testament") is a collection of diverse books that is central to worldwide social, political, and religious experience. Despite this centrality, there are many mysteries and misconceptions about how the Bible came into being and what it really says. In this class, we will explore the Bible's historical context and ancient meaning, with a focus on matters of composition and early reception. Moving beyond the project of identifying texts with authors, we will use biblical and ancient non-biblical sources to situate biblical authors with respect to institutions, class, gender, and more.

Instructors
Madadh Richey
Wittgenstein's Religious Thought

No description available

Instructors
Staff
Women and American Religion (SA)

This course explores the dynamics of religion, gender, and power in American religious history, with case studies of women in a variety of traditions. We consider how theologies, religious practices, and institutional structures shape gender systems; women's religious leadership; gender and religious constraint and dissent; race and women's religious experiences; and religion and sexuality. Each student's final digital history project (e.g. podcast, online museum exhibition, Wikipedia page, digital oral history, audio walking tour, digitized primary source) will contribute to a collaborative digital exhibition.

Instructors
Judith Weisenfeld
Women and Gender in Islamic Societies (SA)

What were/are the representations of gender and sexuality in Muslim societies in the past and present? Is there one Islam or Islams? What are the domestic, ritual, economic, and political roles that Muslim women have played/play? What about the body, sex and "gender trouble"? What can we learn about the daily lives of Muslim women in past/present? How have modern Muslim women challenged gender roles and male religious authority? Material include: Qur'an, legal texts, medieval and modern literature; newspapers; letters; films; novels; internet sites. Guest speakers. No prior background in Islam or Gender Studies required.

Instructors
Shaun E. Marmon
Women and Gender in Islamic Societies (SA)

What were/are the representations of gender and sexuality in Muslim societies in the past and present? Is there one Islam or Islams? What are the domestic, ritual, economic, and political roles that Muslim women have played/play? What about the body, sex and "gender trouble"? What can we learn about the daily lives of Muslim women in past/present? How have modern Muslim women challenged gender roles and male religious authority? Material include: Qur'an, legal texts, medieval and modern literature; newspapers; letters; films; novels; internet sites. Guest speakers. No prior background in Islam or Gender Studies required.

Instructors
Shaun E. Marmon
Women and Gender in Islamic Societies (SA)

Inter-disciplinary seminar makes use of texts in translation including: Qur'an and hadith, legal treatises, documents, letters, popular literature, autobiography, novels and subtitled films. These texts are supplemented by scholarly literature from religious studies, anthropology, history, gender studies, and sociology. Topics include: women in the Qur'an and hadith, sexuality and the body, woman and law, gendered space, marriage and the family, nationalism and feminism, gender and post-colonial societies, women's voices, women and Islamic revivalism. No prior background in gender studies or Islamic studies required.

Instructors
Shaun E. Marmon
Zen Buddhism (EM)

Are Zen and other religions stable entities with identifiable essences? Or do they lack a core, gradually vanishing as each layer is peeled away? Do they take on different forms in relation to cultural and power configurations? Or can they themselves shape social and political structures? In order to understand these questions and ask better ones, we will examine Zen in diverse contexts, including China, Japan, Korea, Germany, and the United States, to consider the tensions between romanticized ideals and practice on the ground. We will grapple with studying complex religious traditions with complicated and sometimes troubling histories.

Instructors
Bryan D. Lowe
Zen Buddhism (CD or EM)

Most people have heard of Zen Buddhism, but what is it? Who gets to define it? This class looks at Zen in China, Korea, Germany, Japan, Vietnam, and the United States through a range of methods from reading classic texts to studying ethnographic accounts. By considering Zen in different times and places, we explore how a religion is shaped by its political and cultural environs. We examine tensions between romanticized ideals and practices on the ground and grapple with how to study complicated and sometimes troubling traditions. Topics include myths, meditation, mindfulness, monastic life, gender, war, and death.

Instructors
Bryan D. Lowe

Undergraduate

Fall 2022

Spring 2022

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