Undergraduate Courses

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Philology and History of Jewish Sources (HA)
Subject associations
REL 403 / JDS 403

This course offers to students with significant background in Jewish Studies orientation to the critical tools for studying the Jewish tradition and its development in multiple geographical and historical contexts. We begin with the Hebrew Bible, go through Rabbinic Literature, continue through Kabbalah and the Early Modern period. Knowledge of Hebrew and Aramaic and background in Bible and Talmud is necessary.

Additional description

Area of Study Requirement: Ancient Judaism, Christianity, and Greek and Roman Religions

Instructors
Yaacob Dweck
Moulie Vidas
Ancient Egyptian Manuscripts: Writing, Materiality, Technology (HA)
Subject associations
REL 404 / CLA 404 / HUM 404

In this course the different types of manuscripts, languages and texts from Ancient Egypt will be discussed. Papyrus is a prominent material from Ancient Egypt and we will study several examples in Princeton Collections. We will also discuss the use of modern techniques in manuscript studies like databases, ink analysis, x-ray and computer tomography. An overview will be given of the different materials including those from Elephantine Island. At the end, the students will curate a small exhibition demonstrating the specialties of ancient Egyptian manuscripts.

Instructors
Verena Maria Franziska Lepper
The Archaeology of Jerusalem: Selected Topics (LA)
Subject associations
ART 409 / REL 409

In this course we will explore, discuss and dispute key archaeological topics pertaining to various aspects of the material multicultures of Jerusalem, from the time of Alexander the Great until its surrender to the Muslem Caliph, 'Umar. During these centuries, Jerusalem grew from a small city into "by far the most famous city, not of Judæa only, but of the East." It became the central sacred locale of the Jewish people, and the cradle of Christianity. During these times, it was twice a pagan city -Antioch in Jerusalem and Aelia Capitolina.

Instructors
Haim Goldfus
Talmudic Research (HA)
Subject associations
REL 410 / JDS 411

This course is intended for students who already have experience with the Talmud and want to expand their engagement with the text by acquiring modern research methods. It addresses the use and significance of manuscripts of the texts; the relationship between the Bavli and the Yerushalmi; the sources of the Talmud and the way in which it was put together. We will trace the development of Talmudic ideas, laws, and stories and determine how and why different versions developed. We will also examine the text in its historical context. Students will be introduced to the online and offline databases and bibliographic tools.

Instructors
Moulie Vidas
Islamic Political Thought (EM)
Subject associations
REL 415 / NES 415

This seminar provides a survey of Islamic political thought from its beginnings in the 7th century to the present. What are the key debates in the history of Islamic political thought - on conceptions of government, on religion and politics, on power, on non-Muslims? How did political thought develop in various Arab, Iranian, and Indian contexts? What transformations has it undergone since the late 19th century? How does the legacy of political thought inform political and religious contestations among Muslims today? These are among the questions we will address in this seminar.

Additional description

Area of Study Requirement: Islam

Instructors
Muhammad Q. Zaman
Islamic Political Thought (EM)
Subject associations
REL 415 / NES 415

This seminar provides a survey of Islamic political thought from its beginnings in the 7th century to the present. What are the key debates in the history of Islamic political thought - on conceptions of government, on religion and politics, on power, on non-Muslims? How did political thought develop in various Arab, Iranian, and Indian contexts? What transformations has it undergone since the late 19th century? How does the legacy of political thought inform political and religious contestations among Muslims today? These are among the questions we will address in this seminar.

Additional description

Area of Study Requirement: Islam

Instructors
Muhammad Q. Zaman
Topics in Modern Jewish Thought: Political Theory (EM)
Subject associations
REL 420

The question of how Jews, the historical "other" of the west, could be integrated into the modern nation state is one of the defining features not just of modern Jewish thought but of modernity more broadly. This course considers the relevance of modern Jewish thinking about the nature of the state, individual and collective freedoms, and political tyranny for modern debates in political theory. Topics include: liberalism, socialism, totalitarianism, race and identity politics.

Instructors
Leora F. Batnitzky
Roman Religion: Sources and Methods (HA)
Subject associations
CLA 422 / HUM 422 / REL 422

What was/is Roman religion? Our main focus in this course will be the nature, variety, and geographic range of the source material for religious practice in the Mediterranean world of the Roman Republic and Empire (6th c. BCE-5th c. CE). We'll examine how, and with what repercussions, Roman religion set the terms for and changed in response to Rome's expansion into a Mediterranean empire. Finally, we'll think about the place of "Roman religion" in the global history of religion, and the usefulness of the term "religion" to characterize how the Romans related to their gods.

Instructors
Dan-El Padilla Peralta
The History of Christianity in Africa: From St. Mark to Desmond Tutu (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 423 / AFS 424 / REL 423

This course will trace the history of Christianity in Africa from the first to twentieth centuries. We will focus on issues as diverse as the importance of Christians from Africa in the development of central Christian doctrines and institutions, the medieval Christian-Muslim encounter, the modern missionary movement, colonization and decolonization, the role of the church in freedom struggles, and more. We will ask the questions:how does studying the history of Christianity in Africa de-center Europe and the European experience in the history of Christianity? And:What would a global history of Christianity, pre-modern and modern, look like?

Instructors
Jacob S. Dlamini
Jack B. Tannous
The History of Christianity in Africa: From St. Mark to Desmond Tutu (HA)
Subject associations
HIS 423 / AFS 424 / REL 423

This course will trace the history of Christianity in Africa from the first to twentieth centuries. We will focus on issues as diverse as the importance of Christians from Africa in the development of central Christian doctrines and institutions, the medieval Christian-Muslim encounter, the modern missionary movement, colonization and decolonization, the role of the church in freedom struggles, and more. We will ask the questions:how does studying the history of Christianity in Africa de-center Europe and the European experience in the history of Christianity? And:What would a global history of Christianity, pre-modern and modern, look like?

Instructors
Jacob S. Dlamini
Jack B. Tannous
Art, Culture, and Identity in Medieval Spain (LA)
Subject associations
ART 431 / MED 431 / REL 431

Before the suppression of non-Christians in Spain and Portugal after 1492, three vibrant medieval cultures inhabited the peninsula: Muslims based in Al-Andalus, Christians based in the northern Spanish kingdoms, and Sephardic Jews throughout both realms. Their coexistence transformed their visual culture in ways that resonated well beyond Iberian borders, from Atlantic colonialism to modern identity politics. This course asks how the contacts, conflicts and compromises provoked by "living with" each other shaped artistic traditions and cultural identity in a land both enriched and destabilized by its own diversity.

Instructors
Pamela A. Patton
Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities: Justice Then and Now (EM)
Subject associations
HUM 470 / CLA 470 / REL 470

This course examines ancient texts that have been central to modern conceptions of justice. We will analyze these texts in their own context, understanding both their own arguments and those that they criticize; look at how they have functioned to support different positions in the more recent past; and interrogate whether they should continue to have a role in shaping our notions of justice, and if so, what role that should be. The seminar will include discussions with justice-impacted individuals, as well as the potential for interested students to carry out a community-based project.

Instructors
Joshua H. Billings
Moulie Vidas
Wittgenstein's Religious Thought
Subject associations
REL 90

No description available

Instructors
Staff
Studies in Theology: Israel and the Nations
Subject associations
REL 90

No description available

Instructors
Staff
Syriac and Aramaic
Subject associations
REL 90

No description available

Instructors
Staff
Studies in Ancient Judaism: Scholars and Their Critics
Subject associations
REL 90

No description available

Instructors
Staff
Philosophy and the Study of Religion
Subject associations
REL 90

No description available

Instructors
Staff
Politics, History, and Providence
Subject associations
REL 90

No description available

Instructors
Staff
Studies in Religion and Philosophy - Social Practices
Subject associations
REL 91

No description available

Instructors
Staff
Junior Independent Work
Subject associations
REL 981

Instructors
Staff