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Kant's Ethical Religion (EM)

A seminar on Kant's ethics, metaphysics, and social/political philosophy insofar as they relate to his thinking about religion. Kant famously criticizes traditional theistic proofs as illegitimate speculation, but his own positive project involves God in important ways, even in the Critical period. In this course, we look at the pre-Critical theology, the Critical arguments against dogmatic and ecclesiastical religion, the positive arguments for "practico- theoretical" and "moral" faith, and the roles played by the concepts of evil, grace, hope, and progress in an enlightened, moral religion.

Instructors
Andrew Chignell
Kierkegaard Everywhere (EM)

We will study the life and work of Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855). His mission as an author begins with a journal entry he wrote while overlooking the sea north of Copenhagen: "What I really need is to get clear about what I must do, not what I must know, except insofar as knowledge must precede every act. What matters is to find a purpose." We will follow in Kierkegaard's footsteps, both literally and figuratively.

Instructors
Hans P. Halvorson
Kierkegaard Everywhere (EM)

We will study the life and work of Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855). His mission as an author begins with a journal entry he wrote while overlooking the sea north of Copenhagen: "What I really need is to get clear about what I must do, not what I must know, except insofar as knowledge must precede every act. What matters is to find a purpose." We will follow in Kierkegaard's footsteps, both literally and figuratively.

Instructors
Hans P. Halvorson
Kierkegaard in Copenhagen (EM)

We will study the life and work of Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855). His mission as an author begins with a journal entry he wrote while overlooking the sea north of Copenhagen: "What I really need is to get clear about what I must do, not what I must know, except insofar as knowledge must precede every act. What matters is to find a purpose." We will follow in Kierkegaard's footsteps, both literally and figuratively.

Instructors
Hans P. Halvorson
Kierkegaard: Religion, Philosophy, and Existence (EM)

This course is an in-depth examination of the authorship of Søren Kierkegaard and his call for an existential revision of religious, theological, and philosophical inquiry. With focus on the dynamic, but complex relation between religion and philosophy in his writings, we will consider topics such as the relationship of ethics and religion; paradox and the limits of philosophy; the task of selfhood; faith and reason; subjective vs. objective thought; the concept of existence; the religious individual in society and culture; neighbour love; freedom, sin, and despair, and critique of state religion.

Instructors
Elizabeth X. Li
Literature and Religion: Christianity in Korean and Korean-American Novels and Films (CD or LA)

This course explores the role of American Christianity in canonical and popular Korean and Korean-American novels and films. While the references to Christianity in these novels and films serve to indicate the active presence of American Christian missionaries in 20th century Korea, we will pay attention to the ways in which the figures of American Christianity function in these narratives.

Instructors
John Park
Love and Justice (EM)

Analysis of philosophical, literary, and theological accounts of love and justice, with emphasis on how they interrelate in personal and public life. Is love indiscriminate and therefore antithetical to justice, or can love take the shape of justice? What are the implications for law, politics, and social criticism? Particular attention will be given to discussions of virtue, tragedy, forgiveness, friendship, and happiness.

Instructors
Eric S. Gregory
Mandalas: Theory and Application in Tibetan Buddhism (SA)

The very first Tibetan Buddhist and mandala in the west was constructed (and ceremonially destroyed) in 1988 at New York City's American Museum of Natural History. Tibetan Buddhist mandalas have since become a more familiar visual image to most westerners. Nevertheless, few are aware of the philosophical connection between their visually powerful aesthetic aspect and their soteriological function. In this course, students learn the theory and application of Tibetan Buddhist mandalas as they look into exactly how and why they make such a strong impression in hearts of Buddhists and non-Buddhists alike.

Instructors
Christopher Kelley
Marriage and Monotheism: Men, Women, and God in Near Eastern Judaism, Christianity, and Islam (EM)

The decline of marriage in recent decades is often tied to the decline of religion. But why should marriage, a contractual relationship centered on sex and property, be seen as a religious practice? This seminar considers the varied and surprising ways in which the great monotheistic traditions of the Near East came to connect certain forms of human marriage - or their rejection- to divine devotion, and considers how marriage worked in societies shaped by these traditions. Spanning biblical Israel to the medieval Islamic world, this course will introduce you to the historical study of Near Eastern religions and to the field of family history.

Instructors
Eve Krakowski
Marriage and Monotheism: Men, Women, and God in Near Eastern Judaism, Christianity, and Islam (EM)

The decline of marriage in recent decades is often tied to the decline of religion. But why should marriage, a contractual relationship centered on sex and property, be seen as a religious practice? This seminar considers the varied and surprising ways in which the great monotheistic traditions of the Near East came to connect certain forms of human marriage - or their rejection- to divine devotion, and considers how marriage worked in societies shaped by these traditions. Spanning biblical Israel to the medieval Islamic world, this course will introduce you to the historical study of Near Eastern religions and to the field of family history.

Instructors
Eve Krakowski
Martyrdom and Religious Violence in the Ancient Mediterranean World (HA)

This course explores the relationship between religion and violence in the ancient Mediterranean world. We will investigate how the shifting discourses and practices of religiously-motivated violence directed both at the self and the other shaped the social, cultural and political histories of specific groups within ancient Mediterranean society. Of special interest will be the emergence of Jewish and Christian traditions of martyrdom against their biblical and Graeco-Roman backgrounds and the impact of the Christianization of the Roman Empire on the relationship between political power, religiously-motivated violence, and communal identity.

Instructors
Ra'anan S. Boustan
Migration and the Literary Imagination (LA)

This course will explore the various meanings of The Great Migration and mobility found in 20th century African American literature. Through careful historical and literary analysis, we will examine the significant impact migration has had on African American writers and the ways it has framed their literary representations of modern Black life.

Instructors
Wallace D. Best
Migration and the Literary Imagination (LA)

This course will explore the various meanings of The Great Migration and mobility found in 20th century African American literature. Through careful historical and literary analysis, we will examine the significant impact migration has had on African American writers and the ways it has framed their literary representations of modern Black life.

Instructors
Wallace D. Best
Mind and Meditation (EC)

This course examines the philosophy, history, and methods of Buddhist meditation. Primary readings will be Buddhist works on the nature of the mind and the role of meditation on the path to liberation (nirvana). We will ask how traditional Buddhist views have been reshaped by modern teachers, and we will interrogate the significance of current research on meditation in the fields of neuroscience, psychology and the philosophy of mind. In addition to other coursework, students will be practicing meditation and keeping a log and journal. Some coursework in Philosophy or Religion is expected.

Instructors
Christopher Kelley
Mind and Meditation (EC)

This course examines the philosophy, history, and methods of Buddhist meditation. Primary readings will be Buddhist works on the nature of the mind and the role of meditation on the path to liberation (nirvana). We will ask how traditional Buddhist views have been reshaped by modern teachers, and we will interrogate the significance of current research on meditation in the fields of neuroscience, psychology and the philosophy of mind. In addition to other coursework, students will be practicing meditation and keeping a log and journal.

Instructors
Jonathan C. Gold
Mind and Meditation (EC)

This course examines the philosophy, history, and methods of Buddhist meditation. Primary readings will be Buddhist works on the nature of the mind and the role of meditation on the path to liberation (nirvana). We will ask how traditional Buddhist views have been reshaped by modern teachers, and we will interrogate the significance of current research on meditation in the fields of neuroscience, psychology and the philosophy of mind. In addition to other coursework, students will be practicing meditation and keeping a log and journal.

Instructors
Jonathan C. Gold

Undergraduate

Fall 2022

Spring 2022

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